SE-DDB

Boeing 727
SE-DDB
c/n 19692

Delivery flight to Transair was in the beginning of December 1967 (2 weeks after SE-DDA) and the aircraft was named "Northern Light". Due to a planned lease to the domestic Nigerian carrier Central the aircraft was repainted in a colour scheme not so different from TSA and with new titles. The lease fell through but the aircraft was flying for a long period with these titles (see picture below).

SE-DDB

In October 1981 the aircraft was, like SE-DDA, sold and delivered to Philippine Airlines as RP-C1241 (see pictures below).

SE-DDB

Boeing 727 SE-DDB was the last plane to leave Sturup Airport and Transair after the close down. In the morning October 9, 1981, the plane was fetched away and took off for the last time from Sturup Airport, operated by a crew from the new owners, Philippine Airlines, who delivered the plane to Manila as Flight PR 241 according to the document above.

SE-DDB

On a foggy October morning former SE-DDB was ready to take off from Sturup airport, still in the wellknown Transair colourscheme but with a new registration.

SE-DDB

The registration RP-C1241 reveals the new home-country - The Philippines - for the plane.

SE-DDB

The crew are proudly posing in front of the "new comer".

SE-DDB

For the last time on homebase - block off for a TSA-plane.

SE-DDB

The Boeing 727 slowly taxes for the last time over Sturup ramps towards the runway sealed in fog.

SE-DDB

For the last time the plane takes off from Malmö-Sturup runway 17 up and away in the fog on its way to Asia and for the last time admired by a mechanic from Transair in his van and a sad photographer.

All photos by: Lars-Åke Holst.

Here is the aircraft in its new Philippine Airlines colour and titles:

SE-DDB

Also this aircraft was resold to TAME, Ecuador in July 1984 and was flying for this company until Jan 28, 2002 when it crashed on a mountain during a passenger flight between Quito and Tulcán.

SE-DDB

2002-01-29: Last Flight for ex. SE-DDB Jan 28 2002

During a 40-min long domestic flight between Quito and Tulcán in Ecuador, flight 120 crashed during a procedural turn before landing in Tulcán. The radio contact was lost 20 minutes after departure and the crashsite is near Ipales on the Colombian side of the border.

After Tulcán the flight was scheduled to continue to Cali, Colombia. The aircraft has not yet been found. Onboard were 83 passengers and a crew of 9.

The aircraft had been flying for TAME as HC-BLF since 1984 and had a total airframes of 63853 hours.

From Aviation Letter February 2002:
"HC-BLF, B 727-134 (19692/498) of TAME Ecuador crashed just below the summit of Cumbal Volcano, near the city of Tulcán, Colombia, 35 km north of Colombia - Ecuador border, after operating flight 120 from Quito. All 92 killed, w/o."

(Photo by Michael Magnusson)